Trump not to re-impose sanctions on Iran

Trump not to re-impose sanctions on Iran

In a statement carried by the state-run IRNA news agency, the Foreign Ministry said Iran "will not accept any change in the deal, neither now nor in future", adding that it will "not take any action beyond its commitments".

The US Treasury on Friday announced sanctions on 14 Iranian individuals and entities, including the head of Iran's judiciary, Sadeq Larijani, for human rights abuses and supporting Tehran's ballistic missile programme.

The legislation is required to include certain "triggers" which will automatically lead to a reimposition of the sanctions if Iran fails to apply.

"In the absence of such an agreement, the US will not again waive sanctions in order to stay in the Iran nuclear deal." he said.

The Iranian government, however, would not be part of those U.S. -Euro negotiations. During Barack Obama's presidency, these penalties largely cut Iran out of the international financial system, until they were suspended under the nuclear deal.

The sanctions were lifted per the landmark 2015 nuclear agreement, which Trump has called "one of the worst" and "the most one-sided transaction the United States has ever entered into". Under the current deal they are set to expire in 2025.

The pact is underpinned on the US side by a presidential waiver of nuclear-related sanctions on Iran's central bank.

Speaking to reporters earlier Friday, a senior U.S. administration official said Trump will seek "a follow-on or a supplemental agreement" with European partners to strengthen the deal he has vowed to scrap. Raj Bhala, an international trade law expert who has studied sanctions, can discuss the announcement, its effects, the nuclear deal, Iran, the country's economy, economic protests in Iran, the U.S. -Iran relationship and related topics.

President Donald Trump walks with National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster from the Oval Office to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, June 16, 2017, for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md., then onto Miami.

Iran says the missiles it has tested are not designed to carry nuclear warheads and insists its nuclear programme is entirely peaceful.

The foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany threw their weight behind the pact limiting Iran's nuclear ambitions and insisted that the Islamic Republic is respecting it.

As for the 2015 deal, Trump has said: "We got weak inspections in exchange for no more than a purely short-term, temporary delay for Iran on its path toward nuclear weapons".

Third, unlike the nuclear deal, these provisions must have no expiration date.

On Jan. 13, French President Emmanuel Macron stressed the "necessary respect by all parties" of Iran's nuclear deal with world powers, in a telephone call with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.