Catholic leaders condemn Trump remarks about Haiti, Africa

Catholic leaders condemn Trump remarks about Haiti, Africa

Trump wrote on Twitter early Friday.

In a series of tweets on Friday morning, Trump said the language used by him at the meeting was "tough, but this was not the language used", stressing that he "never said anything derogatory about Haitians". His response stands in stark contrast to what other lawmakers say they heard at that bipartisan DACA gathering. "Probably should record future meetings - unfortunately, no trust!", the President tweeted. Apparently, he was so frustrated with the U.S.'s lottery system that he demanded to know why other Americans would want people coming over from "shithole countries", like Haiti, El Salvador and various African nations.

"We would not deign to make comments as derogatory as that about any country that has any kind of socio-economic or other difficulties", Duarte said, adding that much like their African counterparts, millions of United States citizens were affected by problems such as unemployment.

The United Nations (UN) in a strongly-worded statement said the USA president's remark was purely racist, while the Vatican has described it as offensive. And for all of you who over the last few years who have uttered that exhausted, lazy, uninformed, uneducated, ignorant, response of calling me and others who point out racist behavior "racist"?

"This is not just a story about vulgar language".

"You can not dismiss entire countries and continents as "shitholes", whose entire populations who are not white, are therefore not welcome", said Rupert Coleville, spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The group of over 50 nations in a statement said: "the AU expressed its disappointment and outrage over the unfortunate comment made by Mr Donald Trump, President of the United States of America".

Maina wants more understanding from President Trump, who is the grandson of an immigrant.

The president met on Thursday with Senators Lindsey Graham, Republican of SC, and Richard J. Durbin, Democrat of IL.

Pascale Marra said the remark goes against a long history - more than 200 years of friendship and cooperation between the USA and Haiti, which share the same democratic values. In subsequent tweets, he noted that a number of individuals who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina were from El Salvador and said that he "feels proud to be Salvadoran".

Samantha Power, a former USA ambassador to the United Nations, wrote on Twitter that she had "never seen a statement like this by African countries directed at the United Nations". That may be how Trump looks at his own relationships, but the United States will never become great simply by stockpiling other nations' best people.