African nations slam Trump's vulgar remarks as 'reprehensible and racist'

African nations slam Trump's vulgar remarks as 'reprehensible and racist'

President Donald Trump * a href="http://abc7chicago.com/politics/trump-denies-describing-certain-nations-as-s***hole-countries/2933712/" *fired back Friday against reports he used vulgar language to describe African countries. A Carson spokesperson didn't respond to a request for comment.

President Nana Akufo-Addo tweeted an unflinching defense of the African continent - and of Haiti and El Salvador, countries also mentioned during a meeting Thursday between Trump and a bipartisan group of senators at the White House.

In other side, the African Union says it is "frankly alarmed" by President Donald Trump's statement in which he used vulgar language to question why the USA would accept more immigrants from African countries and Haiti.

"We have to reform our immigration system, make it more diversified where people from Asia and Europe can come to this country and make it merit-based so if you have a skill you can benefit America", McDonough said.

Dr. Ronny Jackson says in a statement released by the White House that Trump's physical Friday "went exceptionally well".

"Like all countries, Haiti is a collection of people: it's rich and poor, well-educated and not, good and bad", he said. His supporters made excuses and continue to make excuses for him. how many examples do you need of this?

"The AU mission condemns the statement in the strongest terms and demands a retraction of the comment as well as an apology to not only the Africans but to all people of African descent across the globe".

The president reportedly interrupted Durbin and made a derogatory comment about those immigrants, and suggested the US should bring in more people from places like Norway.

In a tweet on Friday, Trump denied using the word "shithole", but Durbin insisted that the president had indeed said it. The most "tough" thing at the scandalous meeting was the "outlandish proposal" made by the bipartisan group on DACA, he added. Illinois Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin, the only Democrat in the meeting, said the president indeed used those words.

Trump's insults sparked the African group of ambassadors to the United Nations to issue an extraordinary statement condemning his "outrageous, racist and xenophobic remarks" and also demand a retraction and apology.

"Botswana government is wondering why Trump use such kind of disruptor as well as derogatory word when talking about countries with whom the United States has had cordial and mutual bilateral relations for so many years", reads part of the statement.

Jean, a refugee from Haiti who came to Canada in 1968 and was raised in Thetford Mines, Que., also noted that Friday was the eighth anniversary of a devastating quake that struck her native country, one of 57 member French-language countries - many from Africa - that form La Francophonie. "We should be talking about how we bring people together", Pugh said.