UK's May Uses Downing Street Back Entrance After Election Debacle

UK's May Uses Downing Street Back Entrance After Election Debacle

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May addresses the country after Britain's election at Downing Street in London June 9, 2017.

Former Treasury chief George Osborne - who was sacked by May past year - called her a "dead woman walking".

Labour had 262, up from 229, and the Scottish National Party 35, a loss of about 20 seats that complicates the party's plans to push for independence.

"The success of the Labour Party winning more seats than expected was because they tapped into anxiety over public spending cuts since 2010, anxiety over the state of National Health Service, and also concerns with youth voters over the amount of student debt and access to United Kingdom housing - two big issues". Less than a year after May was propelled into Downing Street following Britain's surprise referendum decision to leave the European Union, party insiders were placing bets on how long she could last. Allen said she couldn't see May hanging on for "more than six months".

Other Conservatives have emphasised the importance of migration controls, something the European Union says is incompatible with open trade.

"I think if we'd had a large Conservative majority like all the polling was pointing to, then Theresa May could've pushed through her version of Brexit which is outside the single market, outside the customs union with tight control over migration, and not giving much money into the EU pot in terms of paying for access", explains French.

She said Brexit talks would begin on June 19 as scheduled, the same day as the formal reopening of parliament.

The development is an embarrassing turn for the British Prime Minister, who called the vote three years earlier than required, in a bid to give her a strong position in Brexit negotiations.

"Clearly if she's got a worse result than two years ago and is nearly unable to form a government, then she, I doubt, will survive in the long term as Conservative Party leader", former Conservative Treasury chief George Osborne said on ITV.

The two sides are looking to form a "confidence and supply" arrangement.

"We have made good progress but the discussions continue", said DUP leader Arlene Foster.

The alliance makes some modernizing Conservatives uneasy. The DUP is a socially conservative group that opposes abortion and same-sex marriage and had links to Protestant paramilitary groups during Ireland's sectarian "Troubles".

A deal between the government and the DUP could also unsettle the precarious balance between Northern Ireland's British loyalist and Irish nationalist parties. The speech will be followed by several days of debate and a vote - and defeat would nearly certainly topple the government.

Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the SNP, who are likely to have mopped up the votes between them, would have outnumbered the Tories and are likely to have defeated the PM in a Queen's Speech vote, paving the way for a coalition led by Mr Corbyn.

"It is quite possible there will be an election later this year or early next year and that might be a good thing because we can not go on with a period of great instability", Corbyn told the BBC. "This is still on".