Theresa May set to visit Wales in bid to unite UK

Theresa May set to visit Wales in bid to unite UK

The EU has said it was "ready to begin negotiations" on Britain's departure from the bloc after the British government said on Monday (20 March) it would trigger the official exit procedure on 29 March.

The Article 50 announcement came after Britain's envoy to Brussels, Sir Tim Barrow, informed Mr Tusk's office on Monday morning.

But if a better deal wasn't available and people were forced to choose, 41% said Britain should go ahead and leave on those terms, 32% think there should be a referendum on whether to stay in the European Union after all, 27% of people are unsure.

"We're now in for a long period of volatility for the pound and United Kingdom assets as the government embarks on protracted and hugely challenging Brexit negotiations", he added.

The IFG - an independent charity that aims to increase government effectiveness - says departments will need "ruthlessly to prioritise" other legislation and find non-legislative routes to get the laws through, particularly given the government's narrow Commons majority.

"I want every part of the United Kingdom to be able to make the most of the opportunities ahead and for Welsh businesses to benefit from the freest possible trade as part of a global trading nation".

Some in the European Union argue that the divorce must be finalised first - including the contentious issue of Britain's outstanding bills, which European Union officials have estimated at 60 billion euros. The Government will want due recognition of Ireland's priorities in the initial negotiating position.

May's plan to withdraw Britain from Europe's single market has also provoked concern in Northern Ireland, by raising the prospect of the return of customs posts with European Union member Ireland to the south.

Of the United Kingdom's four nations, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to stay in the European Union in the June 23 vote while England and Wales voted to leave. The Prime Minister will give a statement to Parliament as well.

The British government confirmed that it would trigger Article 50 on March 29th, 2017.

The move will pave the way for two years of negotiations, with the country expected to be out of the bloc by the end of March 2019.

Labour's Keir Starmer said the opposition would hold the government to account throughout the process, claiming the prime minister had failed to provide certainty about her plans or prepare for the "clear dangers" of not reaching a deal at all.

"Leaving the single market was not on the ballot paper in the referendum, it is a political choice made by Theresa May", he said.

July. 11: Following a heated leadership contest, Home Secretary Theresa May becomes Prime Minister-elect when her competitors withdraw from the race.