Here's How Republicans Plan to Revamp Their Obamacare Replacement Bill

Here's How Republicans Plan to Revamp Their Obamacare Replacement Bill

As the ACHA stands, it seems that some seniors could be left without adequate care, because the bill's tax-credit structure won't provide as much coverage as the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) subsidies now do.

Republicans remain deeply divided over the healthcare overhaul, which is President Donald Trump's first major legislative initiative. He planned to court House Republicans on Tuesday. Confirmation hearings for his nominee for the Supreme Court, Judge Neil Gorsuch, opened Monday before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

House Republicans announced they'll have a space set up on Capitol Hill for lawmakers to spin their Affordable Care Act repeal and replacement bill to the media before it comes up for a vote on the House floor Thursday.

There's also the new wrinkle, that great big elephant that just shoved its way into the room: the admission from FBI Director James Comey that the Trump campaign is now under investigation for potential collusion with Russian Federation during the campaign. Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., the House's No. 3 Republican and the leader responsible for rounding up votes, wrote Sunday night to his whip team that the "next few days could define us for years to come". "That's one of the things we're looking at".

Many hard-line conservatives have pushed for a more complete repeal of Obama's law, including its requirement that policies cover a long list of services, which they say drives up premiums.

Another change for the bill indicates boosted tax credits for older Americans.

Moderate Republicans, meanwhile, have said the tax credits are too limited and would hurt low earners and older patients.

Collins said coverage issues must also be dealt with, citing a report from the Congressional Budget Office that said 14 million people would lose health coverage under the House bill over the next year and 24 million over the next decade.

"We have to do something about the fact that the House bill disproportionately affects older, rural Americans", Republican Senator Susan Collins of ME said on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday.

The Republican health-care plan moving rapidly toward a crucial House vote this week is likely to be changed to give older Americans more assistance to buy insurance, Speaker Paul D. Ryan said Sunday.

"We are making fine-tuning improvements to the bill to reflect people's concerns, to reflect people's improvements", he said. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) and House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) - that they agree with some of their demands in principle, according to several sources familiar with the discussions.

But several Republicans continue to criticize the bill.

Democrats have been heavily critical of the new health care plan while conservative Republicans have described it as 'Obamacare-lite'.